The SMARTest Way To Achieve Your Goals

The SMARTest Way To Achieve Your Goals

 

SMART Goals

 NLP Mind Tricks

People often set goals feel really motivated and then a couple of days/weeks later lose that motivation. The way to stay focused and motivated is to make your goals SMART.

 

SMART stands for: S – Specific M – Measurable A – Achievable R – Realistic T – Timed

 

An example goal could be “I want to stop eating so much food, because I’m overweight” 

This goal is so general that the goal setter may not achieve it. To make the goal more achievable we can make it SMART.

Specific: Don’t give yourself vague and ambiguous goals or you will achieve vague and ambiguous results. The key here is to make the goal detailed.

 

  • I want to stop eating so much food can become more detailed by saying:
  • I want to stop eating fatty food can become more detailed by saying:
  • I want to stop eating cake (So we have gone from ALL food to just Cake)

Measurable: Always set goals that are measurable. If you don’t measure your goals you will never know if you are moving forward or not.

  • I want to stop eating cake can become for measurable:
  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week 

Achievable: many people set goals that are so high or far that they become unattainable. You can have long term goals, but long term goals are so far away that you can allow yourself to cheat. Always set short and medium goals (or milestones) that are achievable.

  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week can become more achievable:
  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week, I will first cut down to 8 cakes a week.

Realistic: if your goal isn’t realistic then you soon realise that it can’t be achieved, which will in some cases lead to you giving up on your goal rather then creating a new goal. In our example, would the client be happy to cut down/give up eating cake? This maybe a yes or s/he may need to replace the cake with something else

  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week, I will first cut down to 8 cakes a week can become more realistic:
  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week, I will first cut down to 8 cakes a week, and instead of eating cake when I am hungry I will eat fruit.

In this case the client eats cake when they are hungry, it might have been unrealistic to not eat, but now they are replacing the cake, not giving it up

Time: Goals should have a timeframe, with no timeframe many people will just “never get around to it” deadlines can really spear people on. You may chunk a large goal down into several timed milestones.

  • I eat 10 cakes a week and I want to cut down to 6 cakes a week, I will first cut down to 8 cakes a week, and instead of eating cake when I am hungry I will eat fruit. Can become
  • By 5 Dec I will cut down from eating 10 cakes a week to 8 cakes a week, instead of eating cake when I am hungry I will eat fruit.

From “I want to stop eating so much food” we have “By 5 Dec I will cut down from eating 10 cakes a week to 8 cakes a week, instead of eating cake when I am hungry I will eat fruit.”
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